The Italian Paintings Before 1400 Dillian Gordon

Series:
National Gallery Catalogues
Format:
Hardback
Publication date:
26 Jul 2011
ISBN:
9781857094824
Imprint:
National Gallery London
Dimensions:
566 pages: 286 x 216mm
Illustrations:
500 color illus.
Sales territories:
World

The National Gallery in London houses one of the most important collections of early Italian paintings outside Italy, including works by Cimabue, Duccio, Giotto and the di Cione brothers. This completely updated catalogue of the collection is the first published since 1989, and it now includes four exceptional acquisitions from the intervening years: the 13th-century diptych now attributed to the Master of the Borgo Crucifix, The Virgin and Child by Cimabue, The Virgin and Child by the Clarisse Master, and The Coronation of the Virgin by Bernardo Daddi.

For this volume, Dillian Gordon takes into account the substantial body of new research published over the past twenty years to review and in some cases reattribute the works. All but two paintings have been re-examined by the National Gallery's team of curators, conservators, and scientists. Through the use of infrared reflectography, much new information has been revealed regarding the significance of underdrawings and technique. Each work is illustrated in color, and many are accompanied by details and technical and comparative illustrations.

Dillian Gordon was until recently Curator of Paintings before 1460 at the National Gallery, London. Among her many previous publications is The Fifteenth-Century Italian Paintings, a volume in the ongoing series of new National Gallery Catalogues.

'A superb account of one of the world’s greatest collections of early Italian paintings, capable of opening the eyes of even the most practiced viewer' - Jonathan Sumption, Spectator

'Back in 1988, when making emendations to the smaller catalogue of her predecessor, Martin Davies, Dr Gordon described herself as a 'dwarf standing on a giant’s shoulders'. This latest publication of hers leaves no doubt that she has become a giant herself' -Alexander Murray, Times Literary Supplement

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