"Maroon Nation" by Johnhenry Gonzalez

Maroon Nation A History of Revolutionary Haiti Johnhenry Gonzalez

Series:
Yale Agrarian Studies Series
Format:
Hardback
Publication date:
13 Aug 2019
ISBN:
9780300230086
Imprint:
Yale University Press
Dimensions:
328 pages: 210 x 140mm
Illustrations:
4 b-w illus.

Haiti is widely recognized as the only state born out of a successful slave revolt, but the country’s early history remains scarcely understood. In this deeply researched and original volume, Johnhenry Gonzalez weaves a history of early independent Haiti focused on crop production, land reform, and the unauthorized rural settlements devised by former slaves of the colonial plantation system. Analyzing the country’s turbulent transition from the most profitable and exploitative slave colony of the eighteenth century to a relatively free society of small farmers, Gonzalez narrates the origins of institutions such as informal open-air marketplaces and rural agrarian compounds known as lakou. Drawing on seldom-studied primary sources to contribute to a growing body of early Haitian scholarship, he argues that Haiti’s legacy of runaway communities and land conflict was as formative as the Haitian Revolution in developing the country’s characteristic agrarian, mercantile, and religious institutions.

Johnhenry Gonzalez is a lecturer in Caribbean history at the University of Cambridge, where he teaches courses on modern Caribbean history, Atlantic slavery, and the African diaspora in the New World.

“Johnhenry Gonzalez confronts us with the disillusioning dimensions of the revolution that first established universal freedom and racial equality.  Nowhere has this story been told with such a rich array of primary sources and thus with such force.”—Richard Turits, author of Foundations of Despotism: Peasants, the Trujillo Regime, and Modernity in Dominican History
 


Maroon Nation contributes uniquely to a growing body of scholarship on the aftermath of the world’s only successful slave revolution and underlines the existence of conflicting visions of freedom in nineteenth-century Haiti.”—Julia Gaffield, Georgia State University, author of Haitian Connections in the Atlantic World: Recognition after Revolution