"The Coldest March" by Susan Solomon

The Coldest March Scott’s Fatal Antarctic Expedition Susan Solomon

Format:
Paperback
Publication date:
11 Dec 2002
ISBN:
9780300099218
Imprint:
Yale University Press
Dimensions:
416 pages: 235 x 156mm
Illustrations:
77 b-w illus.
Sales territories:
World excluding Australia and New Zealand

“These rough notes and our dead bodies must tell the tale.” So penned Captain Robert Falcon Scott in 1912 as he confronted defeat and death in the crippling subzero temperatures of Antarctica. In this riveting book, Susan Solomon finishes the interrupted tale of Scott and his British expedition, depicting the staggering 900-mile trek to the South Pole and resolving the debate over the journey’s failure.

“An absorbing, fascinating read . . . a book that will appeal to the explorer in everyone.”—Sally Ride

“Solomon argues her case well, in exact and graceful prose.”—Dennis Drabelle, Washington Post Book World

“Persuasive. . . . [Solomon] reaches important new conclusions about Scott’s expedition.”—Sara Wheeler, New York Times Book Review

“Brilliant. . . . A marvelous and complex book: at once a detective story, a brilliant vindication of a maligned man, and an elegy both for Scott and his men and for the ‘crystalline continent’ on which they died.”—Robert MacFarlane, Guardian

“Solomon has crafted a smart, terrific book and an important addition to polar history.”—Roberta MacInnis, Houston Chronicle

Susan Solomon is senior scientist at the Aeronomy Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, Colorado. An acknowledged world leader in ozone depletion research, she led the National Ozone Expedition and was honored with the U.S. National Medal of Science in 1999. Among her many other distinctions is an Antarctic glacier named in her honor.

“[A] brilliant revisionist account of Scott’s tardy and fatal march for the South Pole in 1911. . . . Highly original, beautifully presented and remarkably modest, the book is the fruit of Solomon’s long-standing professional involvement with Antarctica and its history. . . . [Solomon] has written a marvellous and complex book: at once a detective story, a brilliant vindication of a maligned man, and an elegy both for Scott and his men, and for the ‘crystalline continent’ on which they died.”—Robert MacFarlane, Guardian


“[P]ersuasive. . . . [Solomon] reaches important new conclusions about Scott’s expedition. . . . This thorough account . . . will be useful to anyone interested in polar matters.”—Sara Wheeler, New York Times Book Review


“This brilliant revisionist account of Scott’s fatal bid for the South Pole by an atmospheric scientist specialising in Antarctica proves that Scott and his men died not from incompetence, but because of exceptional cold on their return march.”—The Economist


A New York Times Book Review ‘Notable Book of 2001’


“[Solomon is] one of the world’s leading atmospheric scientists. . . . [The book is] the very neatly, indeed thrillingly, told tale of Scott’s journey, along with Solomon’s expert analysis of the weather he faced and its effect on the expedition. . . . Solomon’s is a fine and interesting book, and it sets the record straight at last.”—Anthony Brandt, National Geographic Adventure


“Well researched and well written, and should appeal to a broad readership, as well as to meteorologists and polar historians.”—Cornelia Lüdecke, Nature


“Solomon argues her case well, in exact and graceful prose. She suggests an intriguing solution to certain puzzles about the expedition’s finale, and The Coldest March will appeal to anyone with an interest in polar exploration.”—Dennis Drabelle, Washington Post Book World


"As a vivid depiction of the ordeals and beauty of the Antarctic, Solomon’s book is outstanding."—Frank Wintle, Daily Express (starred review)


“[A] fascinating account that gets under the skin of the tragedy’s players.”—Stuart Wavell, London Times


“The book makes for a ripping yarn, not least because Solomon the scientist can also write.”—Charles Laurence, Telegraph Magazine


“We will never know all the answers to some of the questions that Solomon addresses. One may not agree with all her conclusions, but the book provides new insight into old problems, and may have come closer to the truth than any other book on Scott, his comrades, and their fateful expedition.”—Bryan C. Storey, The International History Review


“Highly original, beautifully presented and remarkably modest, the book is the fruit of Solomon’s long-standing professional involvement with Antarctica and its history. . . . A marvellous and complex book: at once a detective story, a brilliant vindication of a maligned man, and an elegy both for Scott and his men, and for the ‘crystalline continent’ on which they died.”—Robert MacFarlane, The Observer


Winner of the 2001 Colorado Book Award in the Nonfiction Category


Winner of the 2001 Louis Battan Prize in the adult category, given by the American Meteorological Society


“An inspiring chronicle of Antarctic scientific exploration at its most heroic. From the vantage point of history and her personal experience in Antarctica and with all the human and scientific insights of the outstanding scientist that she is, Susan Solomon has written a masterpiece. It is a tale of vision, courage, endurance, patriotism, loyalty, and all the strengths and frailties of the human spirit. Above all, it is good science, good history, and gripping reading.”—J. W. Zillman, president of the World Meteorological Organization


“Scott’s South Pole expedition ended in tragedy. This book is a valuable and sympathetic contribution to the great story, written by the leader of an expedition that ended in triumph.”—Jonathan Weiner, author of The Beak of the Finch and Time, Love, Memory


“A fresh and captivating look at one of the most tragic sagas in the annals of exploration. Solomon takes the reader on a breathtaking ride through Antarctica’s beauty, history, and uniquely forbidding weather. Carefully researched, innovative, and elegantly written, The Coldest March will fascinate and inform anyone intrigued by polar adventure or the interplay of science and society.”—Paul Ehrlich, author of Human Natures and Wild Solutions



“An absorbing, fascinating read . . . a book that will appeal to the explorer in everyone.”—Sally Ride


“A great adventure story, made even more compelling by a modern scientific detective.”—Bruce Babbitt, former Secretary of the Interior